Test Your Green Thumb On These Veggies!

Cropped shot of a man chopping vegetables on a countertop

Did you know there are vegetables that need to be planted in seasons other than the spring for the best results? It’s true! The fall season isn’t just for harvesting what has already been planted, it’s for planting many different types of vegetables as well. Growing plants within their respective season is crucial for their development. If you’re looking for plants to grow this fall then you’ve come to the right place. Here are four fall vegetables to add to your home garden.

Arugula

This vegetable can be grown in the spring, but it has the best taste when grown in the fall. Arugula can develop into its fullest flavor when grown in cooler temperatures, so be sure to add this to your fall garden and your fall recipes as well.

Carrots

Many people don’t know this, but carrots that grow in fall soil turn out sweeter than carrots that are grown at other times during the year. Once harvested, they can also last for up to three months when properly stored in a refrigerator, so you can use them in recipes all winter long.

Pumpkins

There aren’t many other plants that scream fall is here like this one does. Pumpkins come in lots of size varieties, so make sure to pick the right size for your garden area. Larger pumpkins can grow vines that go up to 30 feet long. Whether they’re for front step decorations or used in a delightful soup, pumpkins are a much-needed addition to your fall garden.

You might also like: How To Pick The Best Pumpkin For Carving

Radishes

Similar to carrots and arugula, radishes grown in the fall taste better than radishes grown in the spring. They grow quickly, so be prepared to plant every two weeks in order to harvest the maximum radishes for the season.

Any of these vegetables would be a wonderful addition to your fall garden. Make sure you know each vegetables’ respective growing cycle and have planted them accordingly. Also, make sure to plant your seeds ¼ to ½ inch deeper than usual due to the average fall soil temperature.